Watch the DRA’s New Documentary Video: “A River Worth Fighting For”

We are proud to present the DRA’s new documentary video! Titled A River Worth Fighting For, the video examines why Selective Water Withdrawal operations at Round Butte Dam are negatively impacting the ecology of the lower Deschutes River. Then, featuring interviews with Maupin government officials and business owners, the video highlights how these ecological changes are harming businesses and communities that depend on a healthy Deschutes River. And it details the efforts of the Deschutes River Alliance to fight back.

The video premiered last Saturday, February 11, to a full house at the DRA’s second annual Gathering and Auction. It was a fantastic afternoon, with attendees showing incredible support for the DRA’s efforts on behalf of the lower Deschutes River. Look for a full recap of the event in the days to come.

In the meantime, we’re pleased to present A River Worth Fighting For:


Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

New Analysis Shows Significant Ecological Decline in Lower Deschutes River After Commencement of Selective Water Withdrawal Operations

Photo by Brian O’Keefe

In the years since Selective Water Withdrawal (SWW) operations began at the Pelton Round Butte Complex, longtime Deschutes River users have observed and reported what appear to be major ecological changes below the dams. A new report confirms these observations. A new analysis by Portland State University Assistant Professor Patrick Edwards, Ph.D., establishes that the macroinvertebrate community in the lower Deschutes River has significantly changed since surface water from Lake Billy Chinook began to be released through the SWW tower downstream into the lower river. According to Professor Edwards’ analysis, the post-SWW community contains “more non-insect taxa, such as worms and snails, and other taxa that are tolerant to poor stream conditions.” Further, there are now fewer “mayfly, stonefly and caddisfly taxa that are sensitive to poor stream conditions.”

Some background on Dr. Edwards’ study is useful. In April 2016, R2 Resource Consultants, a company under contract to Portland General Electric, released a Lower Deschutes River Macroinvertebrate and Periphyton Study. This was a four-year study, mandated by the Pelton Round Butte Project’s Clean Water Act certification, that aimed to compare post-SWW conditions in the lower Deschutes River to pre-SWW conditions that were documented in a baseline study.

Round Butte Dam and the Selective Water Withdrawal Tower.

The conclusions in the R2 study were perplexing. Among other findings, the authors stated that “[s]tudy results did not identify large changes in the macroinvertebrate community before and after SWW implementation.” The DRA Science Team, which had been following the development of this study closely, identified several problems with the final report, and in the following weeks worked with several outside experts to assess the data analysis and statistical methods used in the study.

Then, a few weeks after the R2 report was issued, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) stepped in. In a letter to PGE, ODEQ deemed the R2 report inadequate and deficient in several key components, and requested that PGE provide a response to correct the “serious shortcomings” in its analysis.

PGE responded to the ODEQ letter by stating that it would address the agency’s concerns and would summarize this additional work in an addendum to the original report—a process PGE estimated would take 6-12 months to complete. It now has been 19 months since that response letter was sent, and the promised addendum still has not issued.

In the same letter, PGE stated that despite its shortcomings, the initial report—which had already been submitted to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) —satisfied PGE’s obligations under the FERC license for macroinvertebrate monitoring. In other words, PGE claimed it had met its requirements with a report that ODEQ had identified as deficient in several respects.

We at the DRA felt it was essential that an accurate analysis of the pre- and post-SWW macroinvertebrate data be completed as quickly as possible. To that end, we contracted with Dr. Edwards to perform a thorough and accurate statistical analysis of the same data used in the R2 report. Dr. Edwards is highly qualified to perform this analysis, as his PhD in environmental science included extensive use of multivariate statistic—an analytical technique commonly used to assess changes in macroinvertebrate communities. The purpose of Dr. Edwards’ analysis was to assess the characteristics of the macroinvertebrate community pre- and post-SWW.

Photo by Brian O’Keefe.

The results of Dr. Edwards’ analysis are truly concerning. Data collected in the springtime showed that the post-SWW community has significantly fewer mayflies, stoneflies, and caddisflies—all species that are more sensitive to poor stream conditions. Data from both the spring and fall seasons showed an increase in taxa that are more tolerant to poor stream conditions, including worms and snails.

As a result of Dr. Edwards’ analysis, there is sound science confirming what many have suspected for years: SWW operations are significantly altering the ecology of the lower Deschutes River. The discharge of surface water from Lake Billy Chinook has caused serious, negative impacts to water quality in the lower river, and those impacts are leading to significant changes in the insect community below the dam complex. Negative changes to aquatic insects are a serious concern, as they support the entire food chain within the river, particularly resident trout, juvenile salmon and steelhead, and wildlife along the river – including birds and bats. Sound science establishes that these changes are statistically significant. DRA believes strongly that these changes can and must be reversed.

Presumably, if PGE’s initial analysis of this data had been sound, efforts in the intervening months and years could have been focused on addressing the ecological decline in the lower river. We certainly hope that work will commence, at long last, but we are proceeding with legal action to ensure no further delay.

For more information about Dr. Edwards’ analysis, read Rick Hafele’s summary of the report here.

To read the full report, click here.


Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

DRA Heads Back to Court

Round Butte Dam and the Selective Water Withdrawal Tower. Photo by Greg McMillan.

The Deschutes River Alliance’s important Clean Water Act lawsuit against Portland General Electric is headed back to court.  2018 will be a critical year in our fight to protect and restore the lower Deschutes River.

We are moving aggressively ahead. On February 26, the DRA’s attorneys will be filing a Motion for Summary Judgment, asking the court to find PGE in violation of its Clean Water Act certification for the Pelton Round Butte complex. The DRA has identified nearly 1,700 violations of the certification, which was designed to protect the water quality and ecological health of the lower Deschutes River. Oral arguments on this motion are scheduled for July. If successful, the DRA will then ask the court for a remedy to these frequent violations that will lead to improved water quality in the lower river.

Photo by Brian O’Keefe

The hard work starts now. The lawsuit we are engaged in is an essential component of the DRA’s advocacy efforts on behalf of the lower Deschutes River and the fish, wildlife, and people who call it home. And the next steps in this litigation, over the coming months, will be critical to the DRA’s efforts to restore cool, clean water below the Pelton Round Butte Project. Keep an eye on the blog for more updates on this important case.

As always, this fight wouldn’t be possible without the support of our many hundreds of contributors—the individuals, businesses, foundations, and allied organizations who are not ready to give up on a healthy future for the lower Deschutes River. As we pivot back to court, we need your support more than ever. Please join us at our second annual benefit auction in February, and make a contribution today to support our battle for the Deschutes River.


Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

Announcing the Deschutes River Alliance 2017 Annual Donor Update!

Dear Members of the Deschutes River Alliance Community,

We are thrilled to share with you our 2017 Annual Donor Update. As you’ll read in the update, this year we broadened our science and advocacy efforts on behalf of all those who treasure a healthy Deschutes River. Our science team has expanded their invaluable research into the causes and extent of the ecological changes occurring in the river, and we’ve used that research to advocate forcefully for necessary management changes at the Pelton Round Butte complex. This advocacy includes our lawsuit against Portland General Electric, where this year we won a powerful victory protecting the rights of citizens to enforce critical water quality standards.

As always, none of this work would be happening without the support of our many donors: the individuals, corporations, foundations, and fellow environmental organizations that make it possible for the DRA to accomplish our mission. We’re sincerely grateful for all your support, and are excited to share our many accomplishments with you, along with our big plans for 2018 and beyond. With your support, we will restore cooler, cleaner water to the lower Deschutes River.

Click here to read about our many successes this year, and how we plan to keep it going in 2018.

And if you would like to make a donation towards our programs in 2018, please click here.

Wishing you all the best this holiday season. Here’s to another great year in 2018!


Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

It’s the DRA’s Fourth Anniversary! Help Us Celebrate and Move Forward.

troutstencil_3_vectored_withcopyright

 

Dear Deschutes River Alliance Supporter,

As a busy summer nears its end and we transition into fall, we would like to take a moment to reflect and to share our immense gratitude for your support and what it has helped us accomplish.

August has truly been a month for the books. In addition to our ongoing science work, we also celebrated a huge victory in our lawsuit against Portland General Electric. Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit sided with DRA and refused to hear a PGE appeal that would have delayed this important lawsuit from moving forward. This decision also left in place a crucial ruling we secured this spring, affirming the rights of citizens to enforce water quality requirements at hydroelectric projects.

We are proud to say that this month also marks the four year anniversary of the official establishment of the Deschutes River Alliance as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Over the past four years, the DRA has worked tirelessly to restore cooler, cleaner water in the lower Deschutes River. Besides our important victories in the courtroom, the DRA Science Team has been diligently documenting the sources and extent of the ecological changes occurring in the lower river.

Of our many accomplishments in that time, here are a few we are particularly proud of:

  • A thermal imaging study of the lower Deschutes River and the area around the three dams of the Pelton-Round Butte Complex. This allowed us and others to have a better understanding of the temperature behavior of the river between the PRB Complex and the Columbia River.
  • Two years (and counting) of algae and water quality studies on Lake Billy Chinook and the lower Deschutes River. This work documents the changes in water quality that have occurred since selective water withdrawal operations began, including the water quality violations that are at the core of our lawsuit against PGE.
  • Three years (and counting) of our annual adult aquatic insect hatch survey. This survey was designed by DRA Board member and renowned aquatic entomologist Rick Hafele, to gather data on hatch timing and densities.
  • Over one year of benthic aquatic insect sampling in two locations in the lower river, to document trends in subsurface aquatic insect activity. This study, along with the hatch survey results, indicates an increase in worms and snails along the river’s bottom, and a decrease in adult aquatic insect populations in the air.
  • Funded a GIS mapping project of water quality in the lower Crooked River, to better understand the source of the pollution load entering Lake Billy Chinook.
This and more have been achieved over the last four years. None of this could have been achieved without the dedication of people like you. You are what keep us on the water and in the courtroom fighting to restore the river we all love.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­


 

Our mission continues to drum in our ears. It beats stronger with each day. As the river grows quieter, our voices grow louder.

Take a moment to listen to board member and key science team leader, Rick Hafele, as he masterfully recounts the abundance of activity that once filled the Deschutes River.

“Song for the Deschutes”
-Rick Hafele



This is where we stand. As we enter our fifth year, we are proud to take with us many victories, but the final battle has not yet been won. After our critical legal victory this month, we are entering a new stage of our Clean Water Act lawsuit against Portland General Electric. Now more than ever, we need your help in our fight to protect and restore this spectacular river.

Many of you have a long history on the Deschutes. All of you have at least one story to tell of time spent by or in its waters. If you have been to the Deschutes this summer, you are likely walking away with a different tone to the story of your day. Maybe instead of catching steelhead, you hooked bass or walleye. Maybe you noticed the failure of caddis hatches to materialize in the evening.  Maybe you left without the sounds of songbirds or the cloud of insects trailing behind you.

Rest assured that this fight is not over. We can revive the once vibrant display of the Deschutes River that you’ve long known. Thank you for your support over the past four years, and cheers to Year Five: may it be the loudest ever.

 


Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

Lawsuit Update: DRA Secures Important Victory For Clean Water Advocates

Photo by Brian O’Keefe.

For months, the DRA has been working to defend citizens’ authority to enforce water quality requirements at hydroelectric projects. This past Monday, August 14, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit appeared to put this critical question to rest by siding with the DRA and refusing to hear a PGE appeal on the issue. This decision will allow DRA’s critical Clean Water Act lawsuit to proceed, and is an important victory for clean water advocates across the country.

A full recap of the lawsuit to this point can be found here. In short, PGE has sought to persuade the federal district and appellate courts to dismiss the DRA’s lawsuit, arguing that citizen groups like the DRA have no authority under the Clean Water Act to enforce water quality requirements at hydroelectric projects. This spring, Judge Michael Simon, of the District of Oregon federal court, roundly dismissed these arguments, affirming that the Clean Water Act “citizen suit” provision clearly authorizes lawsuits like the DRA’s. PGE then petitioned the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit to hear an appeal of that ruling.

On August 14, after reviewing the parties’ briefing, a Ninth Circuit panel of judges denied PGE’s request for permission to appeal. This decision will leave Judge Simon’s important ruling undisturbed and allow DRA’s lawsuit to move forward.

Round Butte Dam and the Selective Water Withdrawal Tower.

The Ninth Circuit’s decision has great significance for water quality in the lower Deschutes River, and for other rivers across the country that are severely impacted by hydroelectric projects. DRA has been working diligently for many months to protect citizens’ essential enforcement authority, and will continue to do so if necessary. And now, we are eager to present the merits of our case to Judge Simon.

DRA’s Clean Water Act lawsuit is a critical part of our efforts to restore clean, cold water and a healthy aquatic ecosystem to the lower Deschutes River. Keep an eye on the DRA blog for more updates as they develop in this important case.


Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

Walleye. In the Deschutes River?

The fish have spoken. And those fish are walleye. Remarkably, there are now walleye in the lower Deschutes River. As far as anyone is aware, this has never happened before. We wish this was good news. But it’s not.

We’ve been getting reports of walleye being hooked and landed as far upriver as Kloan, at River Mile 7. We’d not mentioned it yet as we were waiting for documentation of a landed walleye. Now we have it–the walleye in the photo below was landed at River Mile 4.5.

Photo provided by Deschutes River guide Brad Staples, pictured on the right.

In addition to walleye, smallmouth bass continue to be been taken in good numbers in the lower river this summer, for the second straight year. Trout and steelhead, not so much.

What does this mean for the lower river? As the lower river ecology and habitat changes due to Selective Water Withdrawal operations, so do the species that thrive in the new conditions. Warmer water attracts warm water fish. As insect populations decrease, piscivorous fish (fish that feed on other fish) increase.

Further, this is not good news for salmon and steelhead juvenile migration. Juvenile steelhead and salmon are preferred food items for walleye and often for bass, much as they are for northern pikeminnow. Bass and walleye are also capable of feeding on crawdads, worms and insects, and generally are known for being highly predatory feeding machines.

Looking into the mouth of the walleye. Photo from American Expedition.

We are repeatedly told by the agencies responsible for Deschutes River management that nothing has changed in the lower Deschutes River since the implementation of surface water withdrawal at Round Butte Dam. But lets consider the list of easily observable changes:

  • Bass and walleye incursion
  • Increased water temperatures throughout the lower river’s 100 miles, from mid-winter through spring and summer
  • Black Spot Disease widely spread in trout, steelhead, and bull trout
  • Invasive nuisance algae
  • Significant change in insect community structure, and decline in adult insect abundance
  • Observations of declining bird populations

Clearly, this is no longer the river we knew prior to 2010. But fortunately, we know these problems are not inevitable. A return to cooler, cleaner water discharged from the Pelton Round Butte Project can begin alleviating these discouraging ecological changes in the lower river. It’s time for the responsible agencies, dam operators, and other parties to admit that the Selective Water Withdrawal tower is responsible for some serious unintended consequences, and begin charting a new path forward for lower river management.

The Deschutes River Alliance will remain on the front lines of the battle to restore this treasured river. Please join us in our efforts.


Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.