It’s the DRA’s Fourth Anniversary! Help Us Celebrate and Move Forward.

troutstencil_3_vectored_withcopyright

 

Dear Deschutes River Alliance Supporter,

As a busy summer nears its end and we transition into fall, we would like to take a moment to reflect and to share our immense gratitude for your support and what it has helped us accomplish.

August has truly been a month for the books. In addition to our ongoing science work, we also celebrated a huge victory in our lawsuit against Portland General Electric. Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit sided with DRA and refused to hear a PGE appeal that would have delayed this important lawsuit from moving forward. This decision also left in place a crucial ruling we secured this spring, affirming the rights of citizens to enforce water quality requirements at hydroelectric projects.

We are proud to say that this month also marks the four year anniversary of the official establishment of the Deschutes River Alliance as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Over the past four years, the DRA has worked tirelessly to restore cooler, cleaner water in the lower Deschutes River. Besides our important victories in the courtroom, the DRA Science Team has been diligently documenting the sources and extent of the ecological changes occurring in the lower river.

Of our many accomplishments in that time, here are a few we are particularly proud of:

  • A thermal imaging study of the lower Deschutes River and the area around the three dams of the Pelton-Round Butte Complex. This allowed us and others to have a better understanding of the temperature behavior of the river between the PRB Complex and the Columbia River.
  • Two years (and counting) of algae and water quality studies on Lake Billy Chinook and the lower Deschutes River. This work documents the changes in water quality that have occurred since selective water withdrawal operations began, including the water quality violations that are at the core of our lawsuit against PGE.
  • Three years (and counting) of our annual adult aquatic insect hatch survey. This survey was designed by DRA Board member and renowned aquatic entomologist Rick Hafele, to gather data on hatch timing and densities.
  • Over one year of benthic aquatic insect sampling in two locations in the lower river, to document trends in subsurface aquatic insect activity. This study, along with the hatch survey results, indicates an increase in worms and snails along the river’s bottom, and a decrease in adult aquatic insect populations in the air.
  • Funded a GIS mapping project of water quality in the lower Crooked River, to better understand the source of the pollution load entering Lake Billy Chinook.
This and more have been achieved over the last four years. None of this could have been achieved without the dedication of people like you. You are what keep us on the water and in the courtroom fighting to restore the river we all love.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­


 

Our mission continues to drum in our ears. It beats stronger with each day. As the river grows quieter, our voices grow louder.

Take a moment to listen to board member and key science team leader, Rick Hafele, as he masterfully recounts the abundance of activity that once filled the Deschutes River.

“Song for the Deschutes”
-Rick Hafele



This is where we stand. As we enter our fifth year, we are proud to take with us many victories, but the final battle has not yet been won. After our critical legal victory this month, we are entering a new stage of our Clean Water Act lawsuit against Portland General Electric. Now more than ever, we need your help in our fight to protect and restore this spectacular river.

Many of you have a long history on the Deschutes. All of you have at least one story to tell of time spent by or in its waters. If you have been to the Deschutes this summer, you are likely walking away with a different tone to the story of your day. Maybe instead of catching steelhead, you hooked bass or walleye. Maybe you noticed the failure of caddis hatches to materialize in the evening.  Maybe you left without the sounds of songbirds or the cloud of insects trailing behind you.

Rest assured that this fight is not over. We can revive the once vibrant display of the Deschutes River that you’ve long known. Thank you for your support over the past four years, and cheers to Year Five: may it be the loudest ever.

 


Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

Third Anniversary!

DRA_logo_sheet

Yes, the DRA is now three years old! And what a wild ride it’s been!

In August 2013, we filed as a non-profit corporation with the State of Oregon. We started on a shoestring budget, which consisted mostly of contributions from members of the Board of Directors. In January 2014 we sent out our first fundraising appeal. It was far more successful that we had imagined it would be.

To those donors, who recognized the need our mission addressed, we wish to thank you. Your trusted us when we had no track record. To the members of the Founding Circle, we would like to offer special thanks.

From that beginning, we have maintained a spirit of frugal but effective activism. For most of our existence, including the present, we’ve had only one paid employee. We have no offices. We’ve kept our overhead low. We contract out services as needed.

Greg McMillan and Larry Marxer taking water quality measurements in February, 2016. Photo by Andrew Dutterer.

Greg McMillan and Larry Marxer taking water quality measurements in February, 2016. Photo by Andrew Dutterer.

What we do have is excellent water quality monitoring equipment. We have board members with scientific expertise and experience. We have an outstanding legal team. And we have a passionate desire to protect the lower Deschutes River.

Larry Marxer and intern Cory McCaffrey calibrating our data sonde. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Larry Marxer and intern Cory McCaffrey calibrating our data sonde. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Here are some of our accomplishments to date:

  • Beginning in 2011, as the Lower Deschutes River Coalition (prior to becoming the DRA), we conducted meetings with Portland General Electric. These meetings included data presentations and roundtable discussions of the problems being seen in the lower river by guides and recreational users.
  • We began sampling and photographing aquatic insects and algae in 2013.
  • In collaboration with PGE, we established a water temperature-monitoring array in 2013.
  • DRA Board member and renowned aquatic entomologist Rick Hafele designed an adult aquatic insect hatch survey to gather data on hatch timing and densities. That study continues on an annual basis documenting changes in hatches on the lower Deschutes River. Rick is also managing our ongoing benthic aquatic insect-monitoring program. Neither PGE nor the resource agencies are monitoring aquatic insects at this time.
Rick Hafele providing training for adult aquatic insect hatch observers. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Rick Hafele providing training for adult aquatic insect hatch observers. Photo by Greg McMillan.

  • In December 2013 we held a science-planning meeting with multiple agencies and PGE. Our science plans have been a product of that meeting.
  • In July 2014, we did a three-day (72 hour) water quality monitoring synoptic at five sites (most of them remote) on the lower Deschutes River.
  • We conducted a second three-day water quality monitoring synoptic at three sites in August 2014.
  • We contracted with Quantum Spatial to conduct thermal imaging of the lower Deschutes River and the area around the three dams of the Pelton-Round Butte Complex.
  • We attempted to collaborate with PGE on a water quality study in Lake Billy Chinook and the lower Deschutes River. The initial planning meeting was cancelled by PGE without follow-up.
  • In January 2015, we submitted objections regarding the Low Impact Hydropower Institute’s certification of the Pelton-Round Butte Hydroelectric Complex.
  • By spring of 2015 we were starting our own algae and water quality study on Lake Billy Chinook and the lower Deschutes River. That study continues today. Cost of equipment and lab fees to date: $30,000. Value of the data: priceless.
Larry Marxer installing a Hobo temp water temperature monitor. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Larry Marxer installing a Hobo temp water temperature monitor. Photo by Greg McMillan.

  • In the summer of 2015, warm water temperatures in the lower Deschutes River contributed to fish die-offs near the mouth and near the confluence with the Warm Springs River. These events were first detected and reported by the DRA and DRA supporters.
  • In the fall of 2015, with the permission and funding of a private property owner on the lower Deschutes River, we established a monitoring station to perform benthic aquatic insect sampling, continuous water quality monitoring, and photo documentation of algal growth. We then acquired the permission of private landowners to set up a second study site in the Kaskela area.
Rick Hafele examines contents of a kick screen on the lower Deschutes River. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Rick Hafele examines contents of a kick screen on the lower Deschutes River. Photo by Greg McMillan.

  • In September 2015 we gathered the five conservation groups who are signatories to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission license for the Pelton-Round Butte Complex to discuss the problems resulting from selective water withdrawal.
  • In October 2015 we appealed the Low Impact Hydropower Institute’s certification of the PRB Complex. Conditions were imposed on the certification as a result of our interventions.
  • In December 2015 we, along with the conservation group signatories to the PRB license, met with PGE to ask for measures to lower river temperatures when high temperatures pose a risk for fish. This request was denied, and PGE foreclosed the possibility of any future meetings.
  • In spring of 2016, we formed our legal team. We subsequently served Portland General Electric with a sixty-day notice of intent to sue based on water quality violations.

This is only a partial list of our accomplishments. These are the kinds of things that are happening at the DRA on a day in, day out basis, and now on a year-to-year basis. Volunteers do much of this work.

Rick Hafele examining trout stomach contents. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Rick Hafele examining trout stomach contents. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Our next year looks to be more exciting and more productive. Check back here over the next few weeks for announcements!

In the meantime, we appreciate all of the support shown to us in the past three years. To all of you who have donated, volunteered, or otherwise supported us, thank you! With your support, our combined passion and love for the river will accomplish great things.


Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

2016 Stonefly Hatch: A Recap

Photo by Rick Hafele.

Photo by Rick Hafele.

It’s come and gone. No one is even talking about it any longer. Why? Well, it wasn’t exactly epic. Or was it?

Here’s the lowdown on the 2016 stonefly hatch based on personal observation; reports from friends, guides and outfitters; emails; and reports to our hatch observer database. This collectively represents hundreds of fishing days, if not over a thousand. None of this will be a surprise to those who were there for it. And many were there! The annual stonefly hatch remains the single largest trout fishing frenzy on the lower Deschutes River.

The first salmonflies were seen mid-April once again this year. Golden stones were seen not long after. Both were first spotted down below Sherars Falls. The big bugs appeared very sporadically until early May. Then numbers began to pick up and the hatch spread further upstream to well above the locked gate at the upper end of the access road above Maupin.   There were a few scattered reports of good numbers of stoneflies during that time. If you were fortunate enough to be on the river those days, the fishing was off the hook.

Then harsh weather set in. It got colder and there were heavy rains and the hatch all but disappeared but for a few hardy bugs clinging to grass and alder leaves.

Days later, the bad weather turned back to good weather and the hatch started back up, progressing up to the Kaskela area. Once more, if you were on top of the hatch in the right location, fishing was excellent. Then once again the weather turned wet and cold for days on end. The bugs again became hard to find. The quality of the fishing suffered. The last guide report of large numbers of salmonflies or golden stones seen on the river was May 17th. Only low to moderate numbers were seen after that until the final observed golden stones were reported on June 5th.

Photo by Brian O'Keefe

Photo by Brian O’Keefe

When weather conditions in the canyon were wet and cold, it was hard to find a stonefly anywhere. The trees and grass were bare. The big bugs were hiding from the conditions. If they aren’t out crawling all over the place, they aren’t finding mates. If they aren’t finding mates, no mating takes place.

This pattern repeated itself three times. Finally a meager representation of the hatches of earlier years hung on for about a week and half, reaching all the way up to Dizney Riffle. Then it fizzled out all together.

Mixed in with the stoneflies in mid-May was about a week and half period where everything was hatching. Green drakes, pale morning duns, pale evening duns, Beatis, caddis, it was all happening at once. There were even a few Antocha crane flies seen! But all of that ended as quickly as it began. And the total numbers weren’t all that exciting. It was perplexing to see June and July hatches in mid-May.

We are still getting some reports of good numbers of caddis in the tops of alders at last light on calm evenings. But the mayfly hatches of early to mid-summer are now totally missing in action.

What meaning does all of this have for the lower Deschutes River and the future of aquatic insect species? If this year had been a one time, one-off affair, it would probably mean little, being what biologists call annual variability. But it’s become a common way for spring to unfold on the lower river.

Most disconcerting is the role this might be playing in stonefly reproduction. Salmonflies emerge after three to four years as nymphs, golden stones after two to three years as nymphs.   Any impact of this year’s weather on mating won’t be seen until 2018 to 2020. The problem is this: with warmer winter and early spring river temperatures as a consequence of surface water withdrawal at Round Butte Dam, stoneflies emerge sooner and into the often harsh conditions of early spring, not late spring/early summer as they used to. The consequence is that reliably they are now challenged to find mates and get their reproduction needs accomplished.

Anyone who has spent years on the lower Deschutes River knows that stonefly numbers are down. Way down. According to Portland General Electric’s Lower Deschutes River Macroinvertebrate and Periphyton Study (page 97), “Stoneflies were not numerically abundant, but were widely distributed and contributed substantially to the invertebrate biomass by virtue of the often large size.”  That was some nice positive spin in the end of that quote, but the reality is that stoneflies are no longer “numerically abundant.” Unlike with many of the mayfly species and Antocha crane flies, this is probably not linked to the nuisance algae growth in the lower river.

Salmonflies as nymphs are detritivores, meaning they scavenge broadly across a river bottom eating dead material, mostly from plants. Golden stoneflies are roving predators and tend to feed on slow moving macroinvertebrates like midge larvae and worms. So the documented increase in worm populations in the lower river should be benefiting them. Nuisance algae are less likely to affect stoneflies as they spend time crawling between or under rocks, avoiding the algae covered top and side surfaces.

That means the declining numbers are most likely due to something else. Most likely that “something else” is hatching early into weather conditions not conducive to mating activity for much of the short adult phase of their relatively long lives. If reproductive success declines, the population declines.

June was a much warmer, drier month than May this year (like most years) on the lower Deschutes River. We’re guessing the stoneflies would have preferred those conditions.

Photo by Brian O'Keefe.

Photo by Brian O’Keefe.

Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Notifies Portland General Electric of “Serious Shortcomings” in R2 Resource Consultants Report on Insects and Algae in Lower Deschutes River

Round Butte Dam and the Selective Water Withdrawal Tower. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Round Butte Dam and the Selective Water Withdrawal Tower. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Citing flawed laboratory methodology and inappropriately applied statistical analysis, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) informed Portland General Electric (PGE) in a May 23, 2016 letter that PGE’s report by R2 Resource Consultants has been deemed inadequate and deficient in several key components.

The primary purpose of the R2 Resource Consultants study, titled “Final Report: Lower Deschutes River Macroinvertebrate and Periphyton Study” and mandated by the dam operators’ Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification, is to determine whether or not operation of the Selective Water Withdrawal Tower at Round Butte Dam has had an impact on the ecology of the river below the dam complex. A baseline study was done in 1999-2001. The present study was intended to compare current in-river conditions in the lower Deschutes River to prior conditions as they were documented in the baseline study.

ODEQ has given PGE until June 30, 2016 to “respond with a plan for mitigating or eliminating the shortcomings of the study.”

As a result, the study’s conclusion that water quality and overall health has improved in the lower river has been rendered an assertion without scientific support. The ODEQ review even went on to say that there are indications that the study supports the opposite conclusion and that water quality has been reduced.

The ODEQ review of the study also expressed the same concern that the DRA had previously described regarding the collection of water quality data and the suggestion by the authors that unfavorable water quality results in the report were due to poorly calibrated instruments.

DRA Analysis of the Report

The DRA had asked four highly qualified individuals (each has a PhD in a field specific to the R2 report) to critique the study. We recently received the first of those critiques back. It is critical of the statistical methodology employed by R2 Resource Consultants and confirms ODEQ’s analysis.

We sought these four reviews as we had major concerns about the R2 report. Almost all of our concerns are mirrored in the ODEQ analysis.

The Selective Water Withdrawal Tower above Round Butte Dam. Photo by Greg McMillan.

The Selective Water Withdrawal Tower above Round Butte Dam. Photo by Greg McMillan.

How Did This Happen?

The macroinvertebrate and periphyton study is a highly important component of the monitoring of the Pelton-Round Hydroelectric Complex impact on the Deschutes River. The installation and implementation of the Selective Water Withdrawal Tower was the single largest anthropogenic change that has been imposed on the lower Deschutes River in the past fifty years. The impacts of that change have to be monitored effectively using appropriate methodology and analysis. This sort of monitoring is mandated by the Water Quality Management and Monitoring Plan, a part of the Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification that sets standards for operations at the Pelton-Round Butte Hydroelectric Complex.

This is the only way to determine if tower operations are having harmful effects on the lower river.

The dam operation permits and certification call for “adaptive management” in the event that there are problems created by Selective Water Withdrawal. To date, the only “adaptive management” invoked by PGE has been to seek agreements from ODEQ not to enforce various water quality requirements imposed on dam operations. The intent of the macroinvertebrate and periphyton study is to determine if that has or has not resulted in damage to the ecology of the lower river.

So the stakes are high for PGE. If this report were to document a decline in water quality and unfavorable changes to the ecology of the river below the dam complex, changes in dam operations would need to be made.

R2 Resource Consultants seem to be highly qualified to conduct studies such as this. But the work was done as a paid service to PGE.

PGE has been entrusted with the responsibility of monitoring for adverse changes to the river system as a consequence of the SWW Tower and its operation. This responsibility needs to be undertaken with a rigorous and transparent approach to assessing the state of a public resource affected by their operations. Anything else is a violation of that responsibility.

Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

The Troubling Loss of Antocha Crane Flies

By Greg McMillan and Rick Hafele

Antocha Crane Fly. Photo by Rick Hafele.

Antocha crane fly. Photo by Rick Hafele.

Antocha is just one genus of the family Tipulidae, a group well known as crane flies. As crane flies go Antocha is rather small, and while most crane fly larvae live in slow moving or stagnant water with silty or muddy substrate (some are also terrestrial), Antocha larvae prefer riffle areas of streams with clean cobble substrate. This little crane fly is found throughout North America, including most if not all of the streams in the Deschutes watershed. Until recently it was one of the insects of the lower Deschutes River that appeared every summer in moderate to large numbers. Whether trout found it of interest could be debated, but its presence was one of those reminders that summer had arrived on the lower Deschutes – but no longer.

Rick Hafele and Greg McMillan first noted the absence of Antocha crane flies in the lower Deschutes River in July of 2013. Until that time these dipterids had been abundant in the lower Deschutes River. By the summer of 2013 other species of aquatic insects had also been observed to be in decline, but Antocha just seemed to have disappeared.

We waited until 2014 to confirm our 2013 observations regarding the missing Antocha before saying anything publicly. We reported our observations here in our blog, and then through the observations of others in our 2014 Lower Deschutes River Macroinvertebrate Hatch Activity Survey Results. Our reports regarding the missing crane flies were initially met with little interest, if not skepticism, by resource management agencies and the Pelton-Round Butte Dam operators, but then confirmed by the R2 Resources Interim Report in the Portland General Electric Aquatic Macroinvertebrate and Periphyton Study. The final report from that study also notes that the disappearance of the crane flies in the lower Deschutes River occurred after the inception of selective water withdrawal at Round Butte Dam.

Antocha crane flies mating and laying eggs in the lower Deschutes River before surface water withdrawal began at Round Butte Dam. Photo by John Hazel.

Antocha crane flies mating and laying eggs in the lower Deschutes River before surface water withdrawal began at Round Butte Dam. Photo by John Hazel.

The final report from the PGE Lower Deschutes Aquatic Macroinvertebrate and Periphyton Study also mentions studies done on the Crooked River and Middle Deschutes (Vinson, 2005; and Vinson and Dinger, 2007; Reports prepared for U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, National Aquatic Monitoring Center) that showed declines in Antocha populations in those rivers. It is worth noting that those studies were done in the years prior to implementation of surface water withdrawal from Lake Billy Chinook at Round Butte Dam in late 2009.

The PGE study concludes that:

“… Antocha crane flies were widely distributed in pre-SWW samples above and below the project but nearly absent post-SWW from nearly all sites including the Deschutes and Crooked Rivers upstream from the project. Significant numbers were observed post-SWW only in the Metolius River, a unique spring-dominated system with minimal development compared to the Crooked and Deschutes systems. Most likely, this change is a result of a broader environmental pattern as opposed to project-related effect. It is unknown whether this pattern represents normal annual variability or a longer term (sic) trend. However, this observation highlights the value of the upstream study sites in distinguishing project from non-project changes.” (Final Report, Lower Deschutes River Macroinvertebrate and Periphyton Study, R2 Resource Consultants, 2016, page 100.)

That conclusion seems to be hastily arrived at, and appears to us to be biased towards exonerating dam operations as a contributor to the disappearance of Antocha in the lower river. Yes, studies show that Antocha crane flies have nearly disappeared from the Crooked and Deschutes rivers above the project, and that decline happened prior to surface water withdrawal from Round Butte Dam. Even though the loss of Antocha is still evident a decade after it was first reported, the PGE report suggests that this could be due to “annual variability.”

The study’s authors go on to suggest that the only other alternative is that this is due to a “broader environmental pattern.” Yet they state that the Antocha population is intact in the Metolius River.

In another aquatic invertebrate study of Whychus Creek, Antocha was found to be present from 2005-2014 (Mazzacano, Effectiveness Monitoring in Whychus Creek; Benthic Macroinvertebrate Communities in 2005, 2009, and 2011-2014, The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, page 58).

Whychus Creek is a tributary to the Middle Deschutes River. The confluence of Whychus Creek and the Middle Deschutes River is about three miles above Lake Billy Chinook. A great deal of habitat restoration work has taken place in Whychus Creek in recent years thanks to the work of groups like the Deschutes Land Trust, the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council, Trout Unlimited, and others. The Portland General Electric Pelton Fund, along with other sources, has provided funding for this work.

So in at least two other streams the Antocha populations are intact. It would be interesting to look at other streams in the basin to see what the status of Antocha is. We believe it was very hasty and preemptive to draw the conclusion that this is due to a “broader environmental pattern” when only limited data is available from other streams.

Basin studies show that the Middle Deschutes and Crooked rivers have large anthropogenic influences due to population centers and agricultural runoff. That in turn results in higher levels of nutrients that lead to algae growth. As noted in our 2015 Lower Deschutes River Macroinvertebrate Hatch Activity Survey Results, Antocha crane flies lay eggs in the splash zone of river rocks. Stalked diatom algae, which have become common in the lower Deschutes River since implementation of surface water withdrawal from Lake Billy Chinook, form a barrier to the bare rock Antocha seem to favor for reproduction in the lower Deschutes River. This probably makes egg laying impossible.

Stalked diatom algae covering splash zone of rocks in lower Deschutes River. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Stalked diatom algae covering splash zone of rocks in lower Deschutes River. Photo by Greg McMillan.

From mid-November until late May the water discharged from the Pelton-Round Butte Hydroelectric Project consists of 100% surface water draw from Lake Billy Chinook. Even during summer and fall months, there is a minimum of 35% surface water draw (Pelton Round Butte Project, FERC No. 2030, Water Quality Report, 2015). We know that for much of the year, surface water in the forebay of Round Butte Dam consists primarily of water from the Crooked and Middle Deschutes rivers (Deschutes River Alliance 2015 Water Quality Report and unpublished data from 2016, pending publication in 2017).

Given that Antocha crane flies disappeared from the Crooked and Middle Deschutes rivers prior to the institution of surface water withdrawal, and surface water withdrawal is heavily influenced by the water quality of these rivers, we believe that there is another hypothesis for the massive decline of Antocha in the lower Deschutes River. We propose that the causative agent of Antocha decline in those rivers is now being passed down into the lower Deschutes River as a consequence of surface water withdrawal at Round Butte Dam.

That cause could be any, or a combination, of several possible agents.

The first is the nutrients in surface water withdrawal at Round Butte Dam fueling the stalked diatom proliferation in the lower river, which is denying access to clean rock surfaces necessary for Antocha mating and egg-laying.

The second possible cause is that a pesticide or other agent entering the Crooked and Middle Deschutes Rivers is being transferred downstream in surface water from Lake Billy Chinook.

Antocha crane flies have also been found to be susceptible to parasitic infestations (International Review of Hydrobiology, Vol. 92. Issue 4-5, pg. 545-553, August 2007). This raises a host of issues that could possibly be related to the ecological changes brought by surface water withdrawal from Lake Billy Chinook. A parasite could have been transported to the lower river via surface water withdrawal at Round Butte Dam, or water conditions changed by surface water withdrawal, could now be favoring a parasite that has possibly infected Antocha.

How important is the disappearance of Antocha crane flies? That is hard to tell. However their disappearance from the lower Deschutes River, and the Crooked and Middle Deschutes rivers, should be taken as an indication of an ecological change. Their disappearance warrants deeper investigation and not just casual dismissal of a phenomenon that could be indicative of a larger ecological problem.

Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

2015 Lower Deschutes River Aquatic Insect Hatch Activity Survey Results Report by Rick Hafele Now Available

The annual DRA aquatic insect hatch observation report for 2015 is posted to our website. Please click here to access the report.

Photo by Rick Hafele

Photo by Rick Hafele

This report, authored by Rick Hafele, is the result of the many hatch observations in 2015 by several professional guides on the lower Deschutes River. All observers received training at a Deschutes River Alliance workshop in Maupin in March of 2015. They then utilized a mobile device app to report their observations.

We want to give special thanks to the guides who participated (and continue to participate in 2016) in this process. They are: Brian Silvey, John Smeraglio, Evan Unti, Harley Faria, Alex Gonsiewski, and Dan Anthon. We would also like to thank Dave Moskowitz and Rick Trout for the reports they furnished.

The observations are summarized in this report. A continuing trend of earlier hatches, and of fewer and less dense hatches is noted once again in 2015. These trends were seen throughout the months of March to October. Declines from the previous two years were observed for all major groups of insects except midges, which remain unchanged.

Antocha crane fly adult. Photo by Rick Hafele.

Antocha crane fly adult. Photo by Rick Hafele.

The report is 29 pages long and full of information any angler needs to better understand fly-fishing the lower Deschutes River, as well as the trends in aquatic insect populations that have historically occupied the Deschutes River.

The DRA is especially grateful to Rick Hafele for his expertise in aquatic entomology and for the work he put into conceiving and organizing this ongoing monitoring effort, the collating and analysis of the observational data, and the writing of the report.

We intend to continue this monitoring effort to provide surveillance of the long-term trends in lower Deschutes River aquatic insects. The training for the 2016 hatch observers took place in March. We are already receiving their reports for the 2016 report. We’ve also added two benthic (river bottom) kick-sample sites that we began sampling in the fall of 2016.   Since Portland General Electric completed their macroinvertebrate and periphyton sampling in April/May of 2015, no one other than the DRA is monitoring aquatic insect populations in the lower Deschutes River.

Chuck Kenlan with an early evening fish that rose to a caddis imitation. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Chuck Kenlan with an early evening fish that rose to a caddis imitation. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.

Portland General Electric Releases Report and Results Of Two Year Study of Lower Deschutes Macroinvertebrates and Periphyton

Study described as finding “post-Selective Water Withdrawal conditions similar to pre-Selective Water Withdrawal, or improved.”

The final report for the Portland General Electric Company’s Lower Deschutes River Macroinvertebrate and Periphyton Study was presented on April 6th and 8th, at meetings hosted by PGE.  R2 Resource Consultants of Redmond, Washington conducted the study, which was completed under contract to, and funded by, PGE.  It was a two-year study conducted over two months (April and October) each year starting in October 2013.  The study was a required condition of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission licensing of the Pelton-Round Butte Hydroelectric Complex.

Yes, you read the stated conclusion of the study correctly.  Conditions in the lower Deschutes River are “not significantly different, post implementation of surface water withdrawal at Round Butte Dam in 2009, than conditions prior to surface water withdrawal.” In fact, according Tim Nightengale of R2 Resource Consultants, the “health of the river is probably better(!) now.”   (We have been unable to find this actual statement in the published version of the study.)  So why the serious disconnect between the described study results and what we are seeing on the lower Deschutes River?

As one property owner said at the Portland presentation of the study results, “I’ve been on the river for over fifty years and the river has never looked like it has in the last few years.”  His disappointment was that none of the negative changes are reflected in the report.  We had the same disappointment.

Again, why the disconnect?

Over the next few months we’ll be answering that question.  The full published version of the study is a 283-page pdf file.  It will take us some time to fully analyze the study and its purported results.   There appear to be a large number of issues that require full examination.

We will also be sending the study out for review and analysis to independent experts.  Following those reviews, we will be publishing an analysis and critique of the study.  We expect this process to take two to three months.

For now, we do want to be clear that we already see some troubling statements and findings in the report.  We will be following up on some of those statements via this blog, prior to publication of the comprehensive review.

Copies of the full report are available here (pdf):

https://www.portlandgeneral.com/-/media/public/corporate-responsibility/environmental-stewardship/water-quality-habitat-protection/deschutes/documents/deschutes-bmi-final-report.pdf?la=en

 

Unusual bloom of algae in March of 2016, approximately one mile below Pelton Reregulation Dam. Photo by Rick Hafele.

Unusual bloom of algae in March of 2016, approximately one mile below Pelton Reregulation Dam. Photo by Rick Hafele.

Greg McMillan and Larry Marxer taking water quality measurements in February, 2016. Photo by Andrew Dutterer.

Greg McMillan and Larry Marxer taking water quality measurements in February, 2016. Photo by Andrew Dutterer.

Deschutes River Alliance: Cooler, cleaner H2O for the lower Deschutes River. 

Click here to Donate.

Click here to sign up for the Deschutes River Alliance email newsletter.