Watch the DRA’s New Documentary Video: “A River Worth Fighting For”

We are proud to present the DRA’s new documentary video! Titled A River Worth Fighting For, the video examines why Selective Water Withdrawal operations at Round Butte Dam are negatively impacting the ecology of the lower Deschutes River. Then, featuring interviews with Maupin government officials and business owners, the video highlights how these ecological changes are harming businesses and communities that depend on a healthy Deschutes River. And it details the efforts of the Deschutes River Alliance to fight back.

The video premiered last Saturday, February 11, to a full house at the DRA’s second annual Gathering and Auction. It was a fantastic afternoon, with attendees showing incredible support for the DRA’s efforts on behalf of the lower Deschutes River. Look for a full recap of the event in the days to come.

In the meantime, we’re pleased to present A River Worth Fighting For:


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New Analysis Shows Significant Ecological Decline in Lower Deschutes River After Commencement of Selective Water Withdrawal Operations

Photo by Brian O’Keefe

In the years since Selective Water Withdrawal (SWW) operations began at the Pelton Round Butte Complex, longtime Deschutes River users have observed and reported what appear to be major ecological changes below the dams. A new report confirms these observations. A new analysis by Portland State University Assistant Professor Patrick Edwards, Ph.D., establishes that the macroinvertebrate community in the lower Deschutes River has significantly changed since surface water from Lake Billy Chinook began to be released through the SWW tower downstream into the lower river. According to Professor Edwards’ analysis, the post-SWW community contains “more non-insect taxa, such as worms and snails, and other taxa that are tolerant to poor stream conditions.” Further, there are now fewer “mayfly, stonefly and caddisfly taxa that are sensitive to poor stream conditions.”

Some background on Dr. Edwards’ study is useful. In April 2016, R2 Resource Consultants, a company under contract to Portland General Electric, released a Lower Deschutes River Macroinvertebrate and Periphyton Study. This was a four-year study, mandated by the Pelton Round Butte Project’s Clean Water Act certification, that aimed to compare post-SWW conditions in the lower Deschutes River to pre-SWW conditions that were documented in a baseline study.

Round Butte Dam and the Selective Water Withdrawal Tower.

The conclusions in the R2 study were perplexing. Among other findings, the authors stated that “[s]tudy results did not identify large changes in the macroinvertebrate community before and after SWW implementation.” The DRA Science Team, which had been following the development of this study closely, identified several problems with the final report, and in the following weeks worked with several outside experts to assess the data analysis and statistical methods used in the study.

Then, a few weeks after the R2 report was issued, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) stepped in. In a letter to PGE, ODEQ deemed the R2 report inadequate and deficient in several key components, and requested that PGE provide a response to correct the “serious shortcomings” in its analysis.

PGE responded to the ODEQ letter by stating that it would address the agency’s concerns and would summarize this additional work in an addendum to the original report—a process PGE estimated would take 6-12 months to complete. It now has been 19 months since that response letter was sent, and the promised addendum still has not issued.

In the same letter, PGE stated that despite its shortcomings, the initial report—which had already been submitted to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) —satisfied PGE’s obligations under the FERC license for macroinvertebrate monitoring. In other words, PGE claimed it had met its requirements with a report that ODEQ had identified as deficient in several respects.

We at the DRA felt it was essential that an accurate analysis of the pre- and post-SWW macroinvertebrate data be completed as quickly as possible. To that end, we contracted with Dr. Edwards to perform a thorough and accurate statistical analysis of the same data used in the R2 report. Dr. Edwards is highly qualified to perform this analysis, as his PhD in environmental science included extensive use of multivariate statistic—an analytical technique commonly used to assess changes in macroinvertebrate communities. The purpose of Dr. Edwards’ analysis was to assess the characteristics of the macroinvertebrate community pre- and post-SWW.

Photo by Brian O’Keefe.

The results of Dr. Edwards’ analysis are truly concerning. Data collected in the springtime showed that the post-SWW community has significantly fewer mayflies, stoneflies, and caddisflies—all species that are more sensitive to poor stream conditions. Data from both the spring and fall seasons showed an increase in taxa that are more tolerant to poor stream conditions, including worms and snails.

As a result of Dr. Edwards’ analysis, there is sound science confirming what many have suspected for years: SWW operations are significantly altering the ecology of the lower Deschutes River. The discharge of surface water from Lake Billy Chinook has caused serious, negative impacts to water quality in the lower river, and those impacts are leading to significant changes in the insect community below the dam complex. Negative changes to aquatic insects are a serious concern, as they support the entire food chain within the river, particularly resident trout, juvenile salmon and steelhead, and wildlife along the river – including birds and bats. Sound science establishes that these changes are statistically significant. DRA believes strongly that these changes can and must be reversed.

Presumably, if PGE’s initial analysis of this data had been sound, efforts in the intervening months and years could have been focused on addressing the ecological decline in the lower river. We certainly hope that work will commence, at long last, but we are proceeding with legal action to ensure no further delay.

For more information about Dr. Edwards’ analysis, read Rick Hafele’s summary of the report here.

To read the full report, click here.


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DRA Heads Back to Court

Round Butte Dam and the Selective Water Withdrawal Tower. Photo by Greg McMillan.

The Deschutes River Alliance’s important Clean Water Act lawsuit against Portland General Electric is headed back to court.  2018 will be a critical year in our fight to protect and restore the lower Deschutes River.

We are moving aggressively ahead. On February 26, the DRA’s attorneys will be filing a Motion for Summary Judgment, asking the court to find PGE in violation of its Clean Water Act certification for the Pelton Round Butte complex. The DRA has identified nearly 1,700 violations of the certification, which was designed to protect the water quality and ecological health of the lower Deschutes River. Oral arguments on this motion are scheduled for July. If successful, the DRA will then ask the court for a remedy to these frequent violations that will lead to improved water quality in the lower river.

Photo by Brian O’Keefe

The hard work starts now. The lawsuit we are engaged in is an essential component of the DRA’s advocacy efforts on behalf of the lower Deschutes River and the fish, wildlife, and people who call it home. And the next steps in this litigation, over the coming months, will be critical to the DRA’s efforts to restore cool, clean water below the Pelton Round Butte Project. Keep an eye on the blog for more updates on this important case.

As always, this fight wouldn’t be possible without the support of our many hundreds of contributors—the individuals, businesses, foundations, and allied organizations who are not ready to give up on a healthy future for the lower Deschutes River. As we pivot back to court, we need your support more than ever. Please join us at our second annual benefit auction in February, and make a contribution today to support our battle for the Deschutes River.


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Announcing the Deschutes River Alliance 2017 Annual Donor Update!

Dear Members of the Deschutes River Alliance Community,

We are thrilled to share with you our 2017 Annual Donor Update. As you’ll read in the update, this year we broadened our science and advocacy efforts on behalf of all those who treasure a healthy Deschutes River. Our science team has expanded their invaluable research into the causes and extent of the ecological changes occurring in the river, and we’ve used that research to advocate forcefully for necessary management changes at the Pelton Round Butte complex. This advocacy includes our lawsuit against Portland General Electric, where this year we won a powerful victory protecting the rights of citizens to enforce critical water quality standards.

As always, none of this work would be happening without the support of our many donors: the individuals, corporations, foundations, and fellow environmental organizations that make it possible for the DRA to accomplish our mission. We’re sincerely grateful for all your support, and are excited to share our many accomplishments with you, along with our big plans for 2018 and beyond. With your support, we will restore cooler, cleaner water to the lower Deschutes River.

Click here to read about our many successes this year, and how we plan to keep it going in 2018.

And if you would like to make a donation towards our programs in 2018, please click here.

Wishing you all the best this holiday season. Here’s to another great year in 2018!


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Save the Date for the DRA’s Second Annual Gathering and Auction!

Mark your calendar and register now for the Second Annual Deschutes River Alliance Gathering and Auction. Last February’s premier event sold out, and we expect to sell out again, so don’t forget to register early.

REGISTER HERE

The afternoon event will feature complimentary wine from Lange Estate Winery & Vineyards, beer brewed by Freebridge Brewing Co. and a delicious selection of hors d’oeuvres. There will be plenty of time to visit with friends, followed by an auction full of great items, multiple custom-designed Oregon fishing trips with top guides, a relaxing 10 day stay for two in a beachfront condominium in Ambergris Caye, Belize; an exciting week for two in Zihuatanejo, Mexico; guided fishing for two and three-night stay in an over-the-water cabana in Roatan, Honduras; top quality fly fishing gear and much, much more.

More details about auction items and the day’s events will be sent to you as the Gathering gets closer. Meanwhile, be sure to mark your calendar, plan to attend and register early!

This winter the DRA is entering a new phase in our legal and advocacy efforts, including our critical lawsuit against Portland General Electric to enforce water quality requirements at the Pelton Round Butte Project. To ensure that we prevail in this fight for the river’s future, we need the support of people like you – people who are passionate about protecting and restoring the river we all love. All proceeds from the event will benefit the DRA’s ongoing work on behalf of the lower Deschutes River.

Thank You to Our Sponsors!

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pH Violations in the Lower Deschutes River: Why it’s Happening, and Why it Matters

Round Butte Dam and the Selective Water Withdrawal Tower.

There’s been a great deal of focus on how Selective Water Withdrawal (SWW) operations at Pelton Round Butte have impacted temperatures in the lower Deschutes River. It’s hard not to focus on temperature: it’s something we can easily sense and monitor, and increased spring and summer temperatures have led to some alarming changes in the lower river these last few years.

But to understand the full extent of the ecological changes occurring in the lower river, there’s another criteria that’s perhaps even more important: hydrogen ion concentration, better known as pH. pH levels in the lower Deschutes River have increased dramatically since SWW operations began, and discharges from the Pelton Round Butte complex have routinely violated Oregon’s pH standard. Why is this happening, and how are these increased pH levels impacting the lower Deschutes River?

What is pH?

pH is a numeric scale used to indicate the acidity or basicity of a water-based solution. Pure water is neutral, with a pH of 7 standard units (SU). Solutions with a pH above 7 SU are basic (alkaline), and solutions with a pH below 7 SU are acidic. pH is measured on a logarithmic scale, meaning that a pH of 9 is ten times more alkaline than a pH of 8.

In freshwater systems like the Deschutes River, high pH levels are often the result of increased photosynthetic activity. This is because photosynthesis lowers the dissolved CO2 concentration in the water, which in turn reduces the carbonic acid concentration, which raises pH. As a result, high pH levels are a useful indicator of excessive algal growth and nutrient enrichment in freshwater systems.

Post-SWW Violations of Oregon’s pH Standard

Oregon’s water quality standard for pH in the Deschutes Basin is a minimum of 6.5 and maximum of 8.5 SU. This standard is designed to protect aquatic life from the harmful effects of water that is too acidic or too alkaline. While a pH above 8.5 is not lethal to aquatic life, it does not provide adequate protection; pH levels above 9.0 have been found to cause stress responses in rainbow trout, including sluggish movement, reduced feeding, and ammonia intoxication. High pH also indicates excessive algal growth in the river. The water quality certification for the Pelton Round Butte Complex mandates that discharges from the Project fall within this 6.5-8.5 range, to ensure that Project discharges comply with Oregon’s pH standard and that aquatic life in the lower river is adequately protected.

Since SWW operations began, Project discharges have routinely exceeded the 8.5 maximum standard. In 2016 alone, PGE’s own data show 140 days that pH levels rose above 8.5 at the Reregulating Dam tailrace.

While these numbers are alarming, downstream the problem appears to be even worse. In 2016, the DRA operated a data sonde one mile below the Reregulating Dam, collecting hourly readings for several water quality parameters, including pH, from February through November. Data collected at this site are summarized and analyzed in the DRA’s 2016 Lower Deschutes River Water Quality Report.

The pH data collected at this downstream sampling site are truly concerning. Of the 279 days sampled, 234 days had some pH measurements that exceeded the upper pH standard of 8.5. 120 of these days had pH measurements recorded above 9.0, and pH levels did not drop below 8.5 throughout April, May, and June. pH rose above 9.5 (remember, 10 times more alkaline than a pH of 8.5, and a hundred more times alkaline than a pH of 7.5) on two occasions: July 12 and October 14.

It makes sense that pH levels one mile downstream would be even higher than those in the Reregulating Dam tailrace. Increased algal growth in the river below the Project is increasing the amount of photosynthesis occurring in the river—this increased photosynthesis, in turn, continues to drive up pH levels downstream.

What do These Violations Mean, and Why are They Happening?

These newly elevated pH levels in the lower Deschutes River raise two important questions. First, what do these highly alkaline levels mean for the ecology of the lower river? As indicated above, in freshwater systems high pH levels are a strong indicator of excessive algal growth caused by nutrient enrichment. This will come as no surprise to anyone who has seen (or slipped on) the now-omnipresent nuisance algae blanketing the lower river’s rocks for much of the year. And such a high level of sustained pH poses definite stress and health risks to aquatic life including salmon, steelhead, and resident native trout.

Algae on rocks, one mile below the Pelton Reregulating Dam.

The next question that must be asked is: why is this happening? What is responsible for these elevated levels of pH? The only realistic answer appears to be the commencement of SWW operations.

Before SWW operations began in December 2009, discharges from the Pelton Round Butte Project did exceed Oregon’s pH standard from time to time. But these exceedances were relatively rare: PGE and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, in their 2001 application for the Project’s water quality certification, identified only one instance between 1994 and 1999 where pH below the Reregulating Dam exceeded 8.5. In 2007-2009, the three years immediately before SWW operations began, PGE’s water quality reports show far fewer violations of the 8.5 standard.

Further, Oregon DEQ data collected at the Warm Springs Bridge from 2005-2015 show an immediate and sustained increase in exceedances of the 8.5 standard upon commencement of SWW operations.

Clearly, surface water releases through the SWW tower have had a significant impact on pH levels in the lower Deschutes River. This surface water originates in the Crooked River, the warmest of the three tributaries that enter Lake Billy Chinook, and the tributary with the highest nutrient concentration. As a result, more surface water release means more nutrients are transferred to the lower Deschutes River. This in turn has triggered a significant increase in the growth of periphyton algae in the lower river, which has increased photosynthesis, and pH levels along with it.

The encouraging news about these harmful pH levels is that the solution is right in front of us. To lower pH to levels that are again safe for the river’s aquatic life, the Project operators can significantly increase the percentage of water drawn from the bottom of Lake Billy Chinook. Doing so would slow the Project’s nutrient transfer to the lower river; this would be beneficial not only for pH, but also for the health and diversity of the lower river’s aquatic insect populations and the fish and wildlife that depend on them.

The Pelton Round Butte Project’s current pH violations are at the root of our Clean Water Act lawsuit against Portland General Electric. We’ll be working diligently this year to ensure that these violations—and their resulting ecological impacts—are addressed.

Sources

Wagner, E.J., T. Bosakowski & S. Intelmann (1997). Combined Effects of Temperature and High pH on Mortality and the Stress Response of Rainbow Trout after Stocking. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society. 126:985-998.


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It’s the DRA’s Fourth Anniversary! Help Us Celebrate and Move Forward.

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Dear Deschutes River Alliance Supporter,

As a busy summer nears its end and we transition into fall, we would like to take a moment to reflect and to share our immense gratitude for your support and what it has helped us accomplish.

August has truly been a month for the books. In addition to our ongoing science work, we also celebrated a huge victory in our lawsuit against Portland General Electric. Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit sided with DRA and refused to hear a PGE appeal that would have delayed this important lawsuit from moving forward. This decision also left in place a crucial ruling we secured this spring, affirming the rights of citizens to enforce water quality requirements at hydroelectric projects.

We are proud to say that this month also marks the four year anniversary of the official establishment of the Deschutes River Alliance as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Over the past four years, the DRA has worked tirelessly to restore cooler, cleaner water in the lower Deschutes River. Besides our important victories in the courtroom, the DRA Science Team has been diligently documenting the sources and extent of the ecological changes occurring in the lower river.

Of our many accomplishments in that time, here are a few we are particularly proud of:

  • A thermal imaging study of the lower Deschutes River and the area around the three dams of the Pelton-Round Butte Complex. This allowed us and others to have a better understanding of the temperature behavior of the river between the PRB Complex and the Columbia River.
  • Two years (and counting) of algae and water quality studies on Lake Billy Chinook and the lower Deschutes River. This work documents the changes in water quality that have occurred since selective water withdrawal operations began, including the water quality violations that are at the core of our lawsuit against PGE.
  • Three years (and counting) of our annual adult aquatic insect hatch survey. This survey was designed by DRA Board member and renowned aquatic entomologist Rick Hafele, to gather data on hatch timing and densities.
  • Over one year of benthic aquatic insect sampling in two locations in the lower river, to document trends in subsurface aquatic insect activity. This study, along with the hatch survey results, indicates an increase in worms and snails along the river’s bottom, and a decrease in adult aquatic insect populations in the air.
  • Funded a GIS mapping project of water quality in the lower Crooked River, to better understand the source of the pollution load entering Lake Billy Chinook.
This and more have been achieved over the last four years. None of this could have been achieved without the dedication of people like you. You are what keep us on the water and in the courtroom fighting to restore the river we all love.

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Our mission continues to drum in our ears. It beats stronger with each day. As the river grows quieter, our voices grow louder.

Take a moment to listen to board member and key science team leader, Rick Hafele, as he masterfully recounts the abundance of activity that once filled the Deschutes River.

“Song for the Deschutes”
-Rick Hafele



This is where we stand. As we enter our fifth year, we are proud to take with us many victories, but the final battle has not yet been won. After our critical legal victory this month, we are entering a new stage of our Clean Water Act lawsuit against Portland General Electric. Now more than ever, we need your help in our fight to protect and restore this spectacular river.

Many of you have a long history on the Deschutes. All of you have at least one story to tell of time spent by or in its waters. If you have been to the Deschutes this summer, you are likely walking away with a different tone to the story of your day. Maybe instead of catching steelhead, you hooked bass or walleye. Maybe you noticed the failure of caddis hatches to materialize in the evening.  Maybe you left without the sounds of songbirds or the cloud of insects trailing behind you.

Rest assured that this fight is not over. We can revive the once vibrant display of the Deschutes River that you’ve long known. Thank you for your support over the past four years, and cheers to Year Five: may it be the loudest ever.

 


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