Remembering Cam Groner: 1949-2017

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of former DRA board member and Vice President Cam Groner on July 17, 2017. Cam died quietly and peacefully at the end of a many months-long battle with Creutzfeld-Jakob Disease.

Cam is deeply missed by those close to him. He was incredibly bright, sometimes irascible, strong-willed (some might even say stubborn), and nearly always right. A subversive sense of humor kept Cam from allowing any situation to become too serious. Cam could readily quote from memory Shakespeare, the law, Firesign Theater, song lyrics, and nearly anything else that he had been exposed to at some point in his life. This made him an entertaining delight to spend time with.

Cam was the consummate fly-angler. The real deal. The kind of fisherman whose life was centered around and focused on his passion for fishing. The man could fish. He took huge pleasure in every aspect of it. He was a pleasure to fish with because his joy in fishing was so intense and so contagious.

Cam especially loved fishing for steelhead. Later in life, he traveled to the Dean River in British Columbia as often as he could. He loved the wildness of the place, and the run of huge steelhead there.

Cam on the Dean River

But most of all Cam loved the lower Deschutes River. So much so that he and his partner, Ingrid Brydolf, built a second home in Maupin. It was from there that Cam could fish and entertain friends.

Cam didn’t fish much with guides, but when he did he loved to fish the waters of the Deschutes River along the Warm Springs Reservation with his friends Al Bagley and Matt Mendes. Here’s a video where Cam produces an opera, the Hardy Reel Opera, with Matt in the background. Cam loved to hear that reel sing.

Cam did his undergraduate studies at Yale, acquired a master’s degree from Harvard, and went on to graduate from Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College. Cam retired as the Chief Legal Officer for Legacy Health. His retirement career was as the first director of the DRA legal team and Vice President of the DRA Board of Directors. Cam was also a member of the DRA Founding Circle.

The rivers and fish that Cam loved benefited greatly from his advocacy and extensive legal background. In his time with the DRA, Cam worked diligently driving processes to find resolutions to the problems facing the lower Deschutes River.

Cam will be missed most of all by his children Christine, Lauren and Geoff, his life partner Ingrid Brydolf, and his best friend and fishing partner Dave Baca. Our heartfelt condolences go to them, and to everyone else who knew and loved Cam.

Memorial contributions can be made to the Cam Groner Memorial Fund at the Deschutes River Alliance. Please note on your contribution that it is for the Cam Groner Memorial Fund. All proceeds donated in Cam’s memory will go towards the DRA’s legal expenses.

http://www.deschutesriveralliance.org/supporting-the-dra/

Contributions can also be made to the Legacy Health Foundation’s Cam Groner Charity Care Fund.

You may also honor Cam by going fishing, and at the end of the day toasting a glass of good Oregon pinot noir to his life and his memory.


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Check out the DRA’s New Website, and Meet our New Staff Member!

It’s been a busy couple of weeks around the DRA office. In addition to our ongoing science and advocacy efforts, we have two exciting developments to share:

First, we’re thrilled to announce the launch of the DRA’s new website! There, you’ll find easy access to:

…and much, much more. So take a look through the new site, and if you have a moment, we’d love know what you think.

Next, we’re excited to introduce the DRA’s newest staff member, Krista Isaksen! Krista recently moved to Oregon from Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she worked in marketing and program support in both the nonprofit and for-profit sector.

Krista Isaksen, the DRA’s new Development and Administrative Associate

We couldn’t be happier to have her on the team as the DRA’s new Development and Administrative Associate. You’ll be hearing from Krista regularly over the coming months, but in the meantime, join us in welcoming her to the DRA community!

The summer is off to a great start for the DRA. Keep an eye on the blog for more updates in the coming weeks!


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How Healthy Are Lower Deschutes River Redband Trout? Read Steve Pribyl’s Letter to ODFW.

Lower Deschutes River redband trout. Photo by Brian O’Keefe.

Last week Steve Pribyl, retired ODFW biologist on the lower Deschutes River and DRA board member, sent a letter to ODFW Director Curt Melcher and to each member of the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission. The letter responds to recent ODFW assertions regarding the health and abundance of the lower Deschutes River redband trout population. Steve points out several critical misstatements from the agency that misrepresent the results of recent ODFW resident trout surveys. That letter can be read here.

As a brief summary, ODFW has performed electrofishing on the lower Deschutes River each April from 2014-2017 to capture and measure redband trout. After this year’s survey, an ODFW Field Report claimed there “is no indication the population has been adversely effected [sic]” by Selective Water Withdrawal operations, and that “Deschutes redband appeared to be in good abundance based on how easily [sic] they were to catch during this year’s monitoring.” SWW supporters have taken these statements and cited them repeatedly as evidence that the lower Deschutes redband trout population is as healthy and abundant as ever.

Obviously, we are all hopeful that the redband trout population below Pelton-Round Butte is healthy and abundant. However, as Steve explains, there is simply no way to know this based on the ODFW surveys performed to this point. These surveys have all been conducted to collect information on a few metrics, on a limited sample of trout, in only a few locations, at one point in time. This sampling is not designed to, nor is it capable of, estimating trout abundance and overall population health in the 100 miles of the lower Deschutes River. In fact, a 2016 ODFW field report specifically qualified the ability of these studies to assess trout abundance, stating “Abundance will not be evaluated due to the difficulty of accurately estimating trout abundance in large productive rivers like the Deschutes.”

Steve spent 20 years of his 30-year ODFW career on the lower Deschutes River, and performed many of the surveys that ODFW now claims to be “replicating.” In his view, ODFW’s statements on trout population health and abundance are extremely misleading, and are simply not supported by the survey data collected. We are disappointed that ODFW is making such unsupported statements, which are now being repeated by various Deschutes Basin stakeholders. And it is unfortunate that ODFW has not implemented adequate pre- and post-Selective Water Withdrawal monitoring studies to truly evaluate the population health of redband trout in the lower Deschutes River.

Lower Deschutes River Redband trout. Photo by Brian O’Keefe.

It is also unfortunate that such detailed studies were not mandated during the Pelton-Round Butte FERC relicensing process. At that time, ODFW had the authority to recommend various licensing conditions related to fish and wildlife. The agency did in fact recommend several such conditions, which were largely incorporated into the final FERC license. However, ODFW did not recommend that the licensees (PGE and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs) perform any type of baseline redband trout monitoring in the lower river, or any post-SWW follow-up monitoring to assess changes in population health and abundance below the Project. This was a missed opportunity: rather than requiring the licensees to monitor and assess redband health populations, any such studies must now be funded and performed by ODFW. The redband studies performed so far seem designed to minimize cost and staff time, rather than to make detailed, accurate assessments about the trout population.

We think it is also worth mentioning that in ODFW’s post-SWW reports on redband trout health, the agency has failed to mention the black spot disease epidemic currently being observed in the lower river. Any discussion of fish health in the lower Deschutes River right now must include the infections being regularly observed in caught fish. Given the high numbers of Black Spot-infected fish observed by anglers these last two years, it is highly unlikely that ODFW has failed to observe the disease in their surveys.

The ventral surface of a redband trout with black spot disease, caught in the lower Deschutes River in late April 2017. Photo by Jamey Mitchell.

In sum, it seems that native redband trout in the lower river have become a lower priority for the management agencies—and the Pelton-Round Butte licensees—than the salmon and steelhead being planted above the Project. This is truly unfortunate, as the lower river trout population is an incredible native resident resource, and much of the year is what draws anglers and others to the lower Deschutes River.

We urge you to read Steve’s letter.


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Recap and Photos from the DRA’s First Annual Gathering and Auction

Photo by Dave Moskowitz

Photo by Dave Moskowitz

We’ve fully recovered from the DRA’s first gathering and auction, which took place last Saturday, February 11, at the Ecotrust Building in Northwest Portland. We were blown away by the support we received at the event–the building was packed to capacity with DRA supporters, and it was a true honor to host so many old and new friends.

We drank fantastic beers from Freebridge Brewing and outstanding wines from Lange Estate Winery.  Attendees bid on an incredible selection of live auction items, with proceeds going directly to the DRA’s efforts to return cold, clean water to the lower Deschutes River. And we premiered our new documentary film, The Rapid Decline of the Lower Deschutes River, which led to a lot of great conversations about the issues facing the lower Deschutes and where we go from here. The film is now available online–check it out below:

Again, THANK YOU to all who attended the event, and helped make the afternoon so special. The support we’ve received from all of you over the last few months has been incredible–2017 is shaping up to be a huge year for the DRA and the lower Deschutes River. Check out a few more photos of the festivities:

Emcee John Hazel and Auctioneer Grant Putnam. Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Emcee John Hazel and Auctioneer Grant Putnam. Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Steve Light, of Freebridge Brewing. Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Steve Light, of Freebridge Brewing. Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Photo by Dave Moskowitz.

Finally, a very special thanks to all the supporters who donated auction items, time, and expertise to the event. We truly couldn’t have done it without these great folks:

Alex Gonsiewski | Brian Silvey | Brian Henninger | Chris O’Donnell | CF Burkheimer | Craig Sweitzer | Dave Hughes | Deschutes Angler Fly Shop | Dick and Kathy Bushnell | Dillon Renton and Renton River Adventures | Elke and Alysia Littleleaf | Freebridge Brewing | Grant Putnam and Benefit Auction Fundraising | Jeff and Kathryn Hickman and Fish the Swing | John Smeraglio and Deschutes Canyon Fly Shop | Jeff Perin and The Fly Fishers Place | Jerry Swanson and Fishhead Expeditions | Joel LaFollette and Royal Treatment Fly Shop | Lange Estate Winery | Mark Bachman and Patty Barnes of The Fly Fishing Shop | Marty Shepard and Little Creek Outfitters | Micheal McLean | Mike Kuhnert | Nick Rowell and Anadromous Anglers | Pat Becker | Rick Trout | Rick Hafele | Saracione Reels | Terry Vance | Travis Duddles and The Gorge Fly Shop | The Trout Shop on the Missouri | Troy Jones | Warner Munro


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Third Anniversary!

DRA_logo_sheet

Yes, the DRA is now three years old! And what a wild ride it’s been!

In August 2013, we filed as a non-profit corporation with the State of Oregon. We started on a shoestring budget, which consisted mostly of contributions from members of the Board of Directors. In January 2014 we sent out our first fundraising appeal. It was far more successful that we had imagined it would be.

To those donors, who recognized the need our mission addressed, we wish to thank you. Your trusted us when we had no track record. To the members of the Founding Circle, we would like to offer special thanks.

From that beginning, we have maintained a spirit of frugal but effective activism. For most of our existence, including the present, we’ve had only one paid employee. We have no offices. We’ve kept our overhead low. We contract out services as needed.

Greg McMillan and Larry Marxer taking water quality measurements in February, 2016. Photo by Andrew Dutterer.

Greg McMillan and Larry Marxer taking water quality measurements in February, 2016. Photo by Andrew Dutterer.

What we do have is excellent water quality monitoring equipment. We have board members with scientific expertise and experience. We have an outstanding legal team. And we have a passionate desire to protect the lower Deschutes River.

Larry Marxer and intern Cory McCaffrey calibrating our data sonde. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Larry Marxer and intern Cory McCaffrey calibrating our data sonde. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Here are some of our accomplishments to date:

  • Beginning in 2011, as the Lower Deschutes River Coalition (prior to becoming the DRA), we conducted meetings with Portland General Electric. These meetings included data presentations and roundtable discussions of the problems being seen in the lower river by guides and recreational users.
  • We began sampling and photographing aquatic insects and algae in 2013.
  • In collaboration with PGE, we established a water temperature-monitoring array in 2013.
  • DRA Board member and renowned aquatic entomologist Rick Hafele designed an adult aquatic insect hatch survey to gather data on hatch timing and densities. That study continues on an annual basis documenting changes in hatches on the lower Deschutes River. Rick is also managing our ongoing benthic aquatic insect-monitoring program. Neither PGE nor the resource agencies are monitoring aquatic insects at this time.
Rick Hafele providing training for adult aquatic insect hatch observers. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Rick Hafele providing training for adult aquatic insect hatch observers. Photo by Greg McMillan.

  • In December 2013 we held a science-planning meeting with multiple agencies and PGE. Our science plans have been a product of that meeting.
  • In July 2014, we did a three-day (72 hour) water quality monitoring synoptic at five sites (most of them remote) on the lower Deschutes River.
  • We conducted a second three-day water quality monitoring synoptic at three sites in August 2014.
  • We contracted with Quantum Spatial to conduct thermal imaging of the lower Deschutes River and the area around the three dams of the Pelton-Round Butte Complex.
  • We attempted to collaborate with PGE on a water quality study in Lake Billy Chinook and the lower Deschutes River. The initial planning meeting was cancelled by PGE without follow-up.
  • In January 2015, we submitted objections regarding the Low Impact Hydropower Institute’s certification of the Pelton-Round Butte Hydroelectric Complex.
  • By spring of 2015 we were starting our own algae and water quality study on Lake Billy Chinook and the lower Deschutes River. That study continues today. Cost of equipment and lab fees to date: $30,000. Value of the data: priceless.
Larry Marxer installing a Hobo temp water temperature monitor. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Larry Marxer installing a Hobo temp water temperature monitor. Photo by Greg McMillan.

  • In the summer of 2015, warm water temperatures in the lower Deschutes River contributed to fish die-offs near the mouth and near the confluence with the Warm Springs River. These events were first detected and reported by the DRA and DRA supporters.
  • In the fall of 2015, with the permission and funding of a private property owner on the lower Deschutes River, we established a monitoring station to perform benthic aquatic insect sampling, continuous water quality monitoring, and photo documentation of algal growth. We then acquired the permission of private landowners to set up a second study site in the Kaskela area.
Rick Hafele examines contents of a kick screen on the lower Deschutes River. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Rick Hafele examines contents of a kick screen on the lower Deschutes River. Photo by Greg McMillan.

  • In September 2015 we gathered the five conservation groups who are signatories to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission license for the Pelton-Round Butte Complex to discuss the problems resulting from selective water withdrawal.
  • In October 2015 we appealed the Low Impact Hydropower Institute’s certification of the PRB Complex. Conditions were imposed on the certification as a result of our interventions.
  • In December 2015 we, along with the conservation group signatories to the PRB license, met with PGE to ask for measures to lower river temperatures when high temperatures pose a risk for fish. This request was denied, and PGE foreclosed the possibility of any future meetings.
  • In spring of 2016, we formed our legal team. We subsequently served Portland General Electric with a sixty-day notice of intent to sue based on water quality violations.

This is only a partial list of our accomplishments. These are the kinds of things that are happening at the DRA on a day in, day out basis, and now on a year-to-year basis. Volunteers do much of this work.

Rick Hafele examining trout stomach contents. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Rick Hafele examining trout stomach contents. Photo by Greg McMillan.

Our next year looks to be more exciting and more productive. Check back here over the next few weeks for announcements!

In the meantime, we appreciate all of the support shown to us in the past three years. To all of you who have donated, volunteered, or otherwise supported us, thank you! With your support, our combined passion and love for the river will accomplish great things.


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Thanks to Our Donors and Supporters!

DSC_0208

The lower Deschutes River. Photo by Amy Hazel.

On May 16, 2016, we announced that the Deschutes River Alliance had sent Portland General Electric a sixty-day notice of intent to sue for violations of the Clean Water Act at the Pelton-Round Butte Hydroelectric Complex.

Since that time we have received a tremendous outpouring of support, far more than we had anticipated. We are greatly appreciative and want to say thank you. We did not request donations (saving that for a future fundraising effort), but we received many financial contributions to support our efforts.  Thank you to those of you who contributed! We also received a lot of feedback from individuals and organizations. All the feedback has been extremely positive, and we’re incredibly grateful.

We have noticed a comment or two raising an important question that we’d like to briefly address here. The question is whether our suit could impair the production of hydroelectric power at Pelton-Round Butte, or even result in lost jobs as a consequence of protecting water quality and recreational fishing.

So let us be clear about the operations of the Selective Water Withdrawal Tower at Round Butte Dam. The tower only changes the depth at which water is drawn from Lake Billy Chinook reservoir for power production, not the amount of water withdrawn. Tower operations have no impact on the ability to produce power at Round Butte Dam. Nor would the changes we are seeking impact power production in any way. Further, there is no reason to think any jobs would be at risk if tower operations were changed. If anything, changes in fish passage methodology (the reason the tower was constructed) would likely increase job opportunities in the region.

Although surface water withdrawal has no impact on power generation, it is having an enormous impact on water quality above and below Pelton Round Butte. Through our proposed lawsuit, the DRA is working to ensure that PGE complies with the water quality requirements agreed to as part of its operating license.

Once again, we want to thank everyone for their support! The feedback we’ve received in the past two weeks is inspiring and has let us know we are on the right track.

Staffing Change at the DRA

Last month, Andrew Dutterer accepted a new job with the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB). We were disappointed to have Andrew leave his position as Executive Director here at the DRA, but are delighted that he has this opportunity. Andrew had been preparing for this job with OWEB during his time in graduate school, and had performed an internship there hoping to make this opportunity possible. We’d like to congratulate OWEB on their new hire! Andrew did a marvelous job for the DRA and we know he’ll do a great job at OWEB.

Jonah Sandford has taken over as Executive Director of the DRA. Jonah accepted the position after working for us on a contract basis since last October. In that time his work for us has been exemplary, and we’re thrilled he accepted the position.

Jonah graduated from the University of Montana in 2003, and went on to do post-baccalaureate studies at Oregon State University in fish ecology and ecological restoration. More recently, he earned a law degree from Lewis & Clark Law School, and is a member of the Oregon Bar. This background has prepared Jonah to lead the DRA into the future.

Jonah and his wife Gwen have a three-month-old son, and we are pleased to welcome them all to the DRA family. Jonah is already filling the role of Executive Director with a great deal of competence and enthusiasm. We hope you will all join us in congratulating Jonah on his new position with us!

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The Problem With the Water Quality Data in the PGE Lower Deschutes River Report by R2 Consultants

Pic 1 R2 Report

The above report (published in March of this year), as noted in prior DRA blog posts, was of a two-year study of the lower Deschutes River. The purpose of the report was to determine the magnitude of biological changes in the river due to the implementation of surface water withdrawal at Round Butte Dam. A baseline study was conducted in 1999-2001, which Portland General Electric (PGE) summarized in a report published in 2002.

Both studies were contracted and paid for by PGE and were a requirement of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission license to operate the Pelton-Round Butte dams.

The water quality data from the most recent study can be found on pages 47 and 48 of the 2014-2015 report. The results document violations of the basin and statewide water quality standards in both years of the study. The most egregious violations were of the pH standard as established in Oregon Administrative Rules (OARs) 340-041-0021 and 340-041-0135. The Deschutes Basin Standard for pH is a maximum pH of 8.5. A pH of 7.0 is neutral (neither acid nor alkaline, greater than 7 is alkaline).

The authors attempt to diminish these violations by noting on page 46 of the report that, “Regarding the unusually high pH measurements taken in Spring 2015, since these are uniformly high, even in the reference sites, it is highly likely that the meter we used was off in its calibration. Therefore, any in situ measurements taken should be considered preliminary at best, and compared to official measurements taken by PGE or agencies.”

There are many problems with this statement.

R2 Resource Consultants are self-proclaimed experts in water quality monitoring and modeling, so one has to wonder how and why they would be unable to produce accurate water quality data? Why would they have calibration problems? If their equipment wasn’t functioning properly, why wouldn’t they use backup pH measuring equipment? If they didn’t have backup equipment, why couldn’t they borrow equipment or have it shipped in via overnight express? The pH measurement problems they most specifically refer to occurred over several days in April of 2015. That should have been enough time to correct any equipment problems.

There were also very high pH measurements in the three days of sampling in April/May of 2014 (10 out of 12 lower Deschutes River sites were above the 8.5 pH water quality standard). Were their instruments faulty then too?

Or is this an attempt to discard and disregard data that are indicative of water quality problems?

There is another potential reason that the high pH values were recorded during spring sampling in both years. When algae bloom, it increases pH. It does this by absorbing CO2 from water to conduct photosynthesis. The by-products of photosynthesis are sugar and oxygen. Notably, the dissolved oxygen levels on the dates of the high pH levels were also high, with dissolved oxygen saturation levels reaching up to 138%. This occurs when there is excessive algal growth.

We have noted extensive algae growth in the lower river this year, starting in February. We have also recorded pH levels of greater than 9 in April and May 2016.

Algae, early March 2016. One mile below Pelton-Round Butte Reregulating Dam.

Algae, early March 2016. One mile below Pelton-Round Butte Reregulating Dam.

Algae, late March 2016. One mile below Pelton-Round Butte Reregulating Dam.

Algae, late March 2016. One mile below Pelton-Round Butte Reregulating Dam.

We are troubled by the lack of explanation for R2’s “calibration problem(s).” It is standard procedure to have a quality control plan that includes details for meter calibration and procedures if they fail calibration. At the DRA, we maintain a log for each instrument we own. Recorded in each of these logs are the calibration dates, times and results. All instruments are calibrated before each day of water quality sampling. We carry backup equipment.

In the case of our in-river dwelling data instrument, once a month we perform “field audits” where we cross check the data it produces with independent meters and manual techniques. We cross check the performance of our meters.

We have such a stringent quality control program because two of our field staff worked for the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) for decades, doing water quality work. We exercise the same quality control methodology that ODEQ uses. We would suggest that PGE require the same of contractors doing water quality work.

DRA water quality staff at work:

Larry Marxer measuring dissolved oxygen in river water, using the Winkler method.

Larry Marxer measuring dissolved oxygen in river water, using the Winkler method.

Rick Hafele doing water quality measurements on Lake Billy Chinook.

Rick Hafele doing water quality measurements on Lake Billy Chinook.

Greg McMillan going old school on water quality measurements in 1979 (when old school was just school, or maybe pre-school).

Greg McMillan going old school on water quality measurements in 1979 (when old school was just school, or maybe pre-school).

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